What? I’m watching radio?

by Terri Reddout

There was a day and time where people would actually gather around a radio set and “watch” radio.  When radios first moved into our homes they were a bit clunkier.  As you can see in this picture, the radio was slightly smaller than today’s big screen TVs.

Whenever your program came on, you ran into the living room, sat down in front of the radio and watched it as you listened to the drama of Little Orphan Annie,  the comedy of the Jack Benny Show or the soap opera The Guiding Light.

A new trend in radio may have us watching radio again, but in an entirely different way.  First, you need some background.

Radio… still hanging in there

Some interesting stats from the Pew Research Center Audio and Podcasting Fact Sheet Continue reading What? I’m watching radio?

Perception checking: One powerful tool

by Terri Reddout

In my last post, Perception Checking: An excellent method for keeping your foot out of your mouth, I told you about the benefits of perception checking and the three steps of a perception check.

When I first taught perception checking I would give the lecture and simply turn students loose on the perception checking assignments.  That’s when I learned how powerful a communication tool perception checking can be.

Shakespearean for “Cheater, cheater, pumpkin eater!”

The case of the woman who wasn’t prepared for her perception to be correct

A student asked me if it was okay not to share the details of her perception check in her paper.

I asked why.

She said the perception check confirmed one of her perceptions about her husband.  She had tears in her eyes.

She didn’t want to share the details of what she learned from her perception check with me.  It was too personal.

She never provided me with the details, but my perception is her perception check revealed her husband was cheating on her.

Thus, the inspiration for Terri’s Perception Check warnings. Continue reading Perception checking: One powerful tool

Perception Checking: An excellent method for keeping your foot out of your mouth

by Terri Reddout

Has something like this ever happened to you?

Mandi walks to class one morning thinking what a great day it is.  She sits down in the classroom and takes a sip of her perfectly flavored latte.

As she pulls out her books, she mentally congratulates herself for taking the time to talk to the professor.  After their conversation, Mandi got a much clearer idea what the assignment was about.  So, instead of dreading writing the paper, she hammered it out in 30 minutes.  Mandi felt so confident she uploaded it to Canvas a day before it was due.

Now she’s looking forward to spending the weekend with friends but remembers she needs to send her roommates a text to remind them she’ll be out of town.

That’s when Sam sits down next to her, slams his textbook on the table and says “Why are you mad at me?”

Mandi’s mood takes a sudden shift.  She was happy.  Sam attacked her and she doesn’t understand why.  She was just sitting there having a great day and suddenly her buddy Sam comes along , accuses her of being mad and basically ruins what started out to be a great day. Continue reading Perception Checking: An excellent method for keeping your foot out of your mouth

The Perception Process: What makes you perceive what you perceive

by Terri Reddout

Do you see the horse in this picture?  If you can’t well, you’re dumb.

It’s a picture of a horse.  Trust me.  All you have to do is turn your head to the right and you’ll see it.  See.  See how dumb you were?

Okay, I know you’re not dumb.  You just didn’t perceive the picture the same way I did.  That’s the tricky thing about perception.

To say someone’s perception is wrong is just plain wrong. Each of us perceive things differently.  Our perceptions influence which truths we see.  Understanding how we form our perceptions can help us better understand how we communication and how people communicate with us.

Each of us pick up on different things that create our perceptions.  It’s called the perception process. Continue reading The Perception Process: What makes you perceive what you perceive

What is news?

by Terri Reddout

Before we can start “shooting” news we need to know what news is.  Generally, a picture of the family cat is NOT news.  Unless the family cat kept mowing and clawing at the neighbor’s door and that woke them up so they got out of the house before it burned down to the ground.  Now your family cat IS newsworthy!

There really isn’t a magic formula for determining what news is.  I wish!  If there were, I’d bottle it up, sell it for a hefty price and retire someplace where temperatures are in the low 80s and bare-chested men bring me drinks with little umbrellas in them all day long.           (I can dream, can’t I?)

Which stories should we cover? What story leads the newscast?  What story goes above the fold?  Which story goes below the fold or on page 3? Do we commit a reporter and a photographers to this story?  Or do we commit the entire news team?

These are all tough questions, with a lot of variables you must factor in.  But… there are some guidelines to help us determine what is NOT newsworthy, what is newsworthy, and just how newsworthy a story is.  You’ll find various versions of these guidelines around the business, but they are generally combinations or more precise  divisions of these seven qualities or factors.

I call them T-P-P-I-C-H-U

Continue reading What is news?

Relationships: Marriage redefined?

By Terri Reddout

Finish reading this blog and increase your chances of staying married happily ever after

Is it because this blog has the secret for a happy marriage?  No.  If I knew the secret, you’d be paying to read this blog and I’d be making a ton of money.

The reason I can say your chances of staying married increase is based on statistics.

If you’re reading this, you’re working at getting a college degree.  Couples with higher education tend to stay married.  By the time you finish reading this blog you’ll be a few minutes older.  Statistics say the older you are when you first get married, the better your chances of staying married.  The other factor?  Economic stability.

This picture is from my son and daughter-in-law’s wedding last summer on the side mountain.  They are bucking the odds.  They both earned advanced degrees.  Both in their early 30s.  They pull in a good income.  He’s a lawyer.  She’s in the medical field.  They a lot in common. Oh, and they love each other, a lot.

Wait until you’re 25 to tie the knot (but it’s no guarantee)

Continue reading Relationships: Marriage redefined?

Types of News Stories

In television there are several different types of story formats we can use to communicate information.  Below you will find explanations and examples for each of these types of stories.  We’ll start with the simplest and work our way up to the most complex.

In addition to watching the video examples you should pull up the News Story Types running order in Inception in order to see how the reporter formatted the corresponding scripts.

READER

Read on camera be an anchor.  No videotape or full page graphic.  May or may not have an over-the-shoulder graphic.  Usually no longer than 20-25 seconds because there are no visuals.  Because there is no video, we rarely do readers at CNW.  I did manage to find one, but really it would have been better if we had added some graphics.

Continue reading Types of News Stories

Speech Outlining… Just fill in the blanks with good stuff Part 2

In Speech Outlining… Just fill in the blanks with good stuff Part 1 we broke down each part of the speech introduction.  It’s important stuff.

Now, let’s take a look at the body of the speech and the conclusion.  Once again, I’ll be using my transmedia outline as an example. (You’ll find a link to my outline on the Week 4 Overview page.)

Transition lines

Sometimes I’ll listen to students speech and find it to be choppy.  Different parts of the speech seem unrelated to each other.  Nine times out of 10 I’ll look at their outlines and discover they haven’t included any transition lines.  You need transition lines.

Think of transition lines as road markers at an intersection.  They help guide the listener into the right direction.
Continue reading Speech Outlining… Just fill in the blanks with good stuff Part 2

Speech Outlining… Just fill in the blanks with good stuff Part 1

When I first started teaching public speaking, I didn’t require outlines.

BIG mistake! Big, big, big mistake.

What I had learned about outlining a weathercast, live shot or classroom lecture was branded into my brain.  Not the case for rookie speakers.

800px-Ducks-in-orderOutlining helps you get all your ducks in an order.  It helps you place those ducks in such an order that your information builds up to a point rather than dashing here or there through a topic.

I still get out a pencil and paper and sketch out what I want to say when I’m giving a class lecture about an important concept.  A lesson I learned from television is I generally only have one shot at getting information across to my students.  Better make it a good one.

Where to start

A good place to start is to download the Informative Speech Outline template from Canvas.  Then, all you have to do is fill in the blanks with your good information.  Since you’ve got it up on your computer screen, let me walk you through it.
Continue reading Speech Outlining… Just fill in the blanks with good stuff Part 1

Do I really have to give a speech? Really?

Yes. Yes, you do. And frankly, you should be excited about the opportunity. People who can speak, intelligently and compellingly, control their destiny and the destiny of others.

Or, if you’re looking for a more practical motivator, the ability to speak well can land you  promotions and big raises.

I didn’t know I knew this stuff when I started teaching public speaking….

When first asked to teach a public speaking class I looked over my shoulder to see who the department chair was talking to. I didn’t think I had the experience or knowledge it took to teach public speaking. Turns out I did. I’d been giving extemporaneous, manuscript and impromptu speeches throughout my television career.
Continue reading Do I really have to give a speech? Really?